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Induction hardening

Induction hardening is used to increase the mechanical properties of ferrous components in a specific area. Typical applications are powertrain, suspension, engine components and stampings. Induction hardening is excellent at repairing warranty claims / field failures. The primary benefits are improvements in strength, fatigue and wear resistance in a localised area without having to redesign the component.

Induction hardening is a process used for the surface hardening of steel and other alloy components. The parts to be heat treated are placed inside a copper coil and then heated above their transformation temperature by applying an alternating current to the coil. The alternating current in the coil induces an alternating magnetic field within the work piece which causes the outer surface of the part to heat to a temperature above the transformation range.

. Induction hardening is a heat treatment process carried out to enhance the mechanical properties in a localised area of a ferrous component. The resultant hardened area improves the wear and fatigue resistances along with strength characteristics. Typical applications of induction hardening include gears, shafts, axles, cam lobes, stampings, and spindles, mostly symmetrical parts. Induction hardening is used to strengthen a specific area of a part. Single piece, surface hardening of selective areas.

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Induction hardening is a process used for the surface hardening of steel and other alloy components. The parts to be heat treated are placed inside a water cooled copper coil and then heated above their transformation temperature by applying an alternating current to the coil. The alternating current in the coil induces an alternating magnetic field within the work piece, which if made from steel, caused the outer surface of the part to heat to a temperature above the transformation range. Parts are held at that temperature until the appropriate depth of hardening has been achieved, and then quenched in oil, or another media, depending upon the steel type and hardness desired. The core of the component remains unaffected by the treatment and its physical properties are those of the bar from which it was machined or preheat treated. The hardness of the case can be HRC 37 - 58. Carbon and alloy steels with a carbon content in the range 0.40 - 0.45% are most suitable for this process. In some cases, parts made from alloy steels such as 4320, 8620 or 9310, like steel and paper mill rolls, are first carburized to a required case depth and slow cooled, and then induction hardened. This is to realize the benefit of relatively high core mechanical properties, and surface hardness greater than HRC 60, which provides excellent protection.

While induction hardening is most commonly used for steel parts, other alloys such as copper alloys, which are solution treated and tempered, may be induction hardened as well. Applications include hardening bearing races, gears, pinion shafts, crane (and other) wheels and treads, and threaded pipe used for oil patch drilling.

Induction hardening

  • Carbon steels
  • Alloy steels
  • Stainless steels(martensitic)
  • Powder metal
  • Cast iron
  • Gray iron
  • Ductile iron
  • Malleable iron